Desalination for California.

JR4PSU

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Sep 27, 2002
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https://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/t...newsntp&cvid=0707081ae4ff441097c70c832332aa0f

One issue is the destruction of marine life from the intake of sea water for desalination. Even with the use of 1 millimeter screens, the smallest there is, you would still suck in plankton. So, you would still destroy some marine live and larvae.

Should we be concerned about destroying larvae and plankton?
AA13Pl2E.img
 

DJ Spanky

Well-Known Member
Jul 25, 2001
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Okay, setting aside the issues revolving around the effect on marine life and the disposal of the resulting brine, let's look at one huge issue that that article really doesn't address.

Where is the energy gonna come from to run these plants? And we're talking a huge amount of energy. California already has an energy crisis that is growing worse. And that doesn't even take into account the mandate to go all electric for vehicular transit in the next decade or so. So you'll have all these demands for energy, where's it gonna come from? Renewables? BwaHawHawHaw!!! Nuclear? Nope, we're shutting those down by subsidizing renewables so that they undercut the price. Fossil fuels? Nope, we're eliminating those. Oh, and another thing, how are we going to transmit that energy as the ancient power grid already has problems with the volume now?
 

pawrestlersintn

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Jan 26, 2013
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https://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/t...newsntp&cvid=0707081ae4ff441097c70c832332aa0f

One issue is the destruction of marine life from the intake of sea water for desalination. Even with the use of 1 millimeter screens, the smallest there is, you would still suck in plankton. So, you would still destroy some marine live and larvae.

Should we be concerned about destroying larvae and plankton?
AA13Pl2E.img
One millimeter filters are the smallest there are? I regularly sell and recommend 1 micron filters, 0.001 millimeter. To your point, though, some plankton are smaller than 1 micron, so some would be lost. However, when backwashing these filters, it would release Concentrated plankton, so anything that eats plankton would love it.
 

JR4PSU

Well-Known Member
Sep 27, 2002
41,033
12,363
1
SE PA
Okay, setting aside the issues revolving around the effect on marine life and the disposal of the resulting brine, let's look at one huge issue that that article really doesn't address.

Where is the energy gonna come from to run these plants? And we're talking a huge amount of energy. California already has an energy crisis that is growing worse. And that doesn't even take into account the mandate to go all electric for vehicular transit in the next decade or so. So you'll have all these demands for energy, where's it gonna come from? Renewables? BwaHawHawHaw!!! Nuclear? Nope, we're shutting those down by subsidizing renewables so that they undercut the price. Fossil fuels? Nope, we're eliminating those. Oh, and another thing, how are we going to transmit that energy as the ancient power grid already has problems with the volume now?
It's all ball bearings, these days.
 

JR4PSU

Well-Known Member
Sep 27, 2002
41,033
12,363
1
SE PA
One millimeter filters are the smallest there are? I regularly sell and recommend 1 micron filters, 0.001 millimeter. To your point, though, some plankton are smaller than 1 micron, so some would be lost. However, when backwashing these filters, it would release Concentrated plankton, so anything that eats plankton would love it.
What I really was after was whether or not some lefties on this board would be concerned about plankton losing their lives.
 

LafayetteBear

Well-Known Member
Dec 1, 2009
48,963
21,889
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https://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/t...newsntp&cvid=0707081ae4ff441097c70c832332aa0f

One issue is the destruction of marine life from the intake of sea water for desalination. Even with the use of 1 millimeter screens, the smallest there is, you would still suck in plankton. So, you would still destroy some marine live and larvae.

Should we be concerned about destroying larvae and plankton?
AA13Pl2E.img
1. Nice outfit (and signs) JR. Green is certainly your color.
2. So plankton is in short supply?
3. Color me shocked at your concern about plankton, Mr. Environmentalist.
 

LafayetteBear

Well-Known Member
Dec 1, 2009
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There have been physical limits to a lot of things that were overcome.

Like this one
Interrobang: Thanks for posting that article. Very interesting. I remain of the opinion that the REAL news is most often found in scientific and technological innovations/discoveries. The rest of the "news" is often just humans arguing about politics, culture, etc.
 

junior1

Well-Known Member
May 29, 2001
7,272
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What I really was after was whether or not some lefties on this board would be concerned about plankton losing their lives.
plankton is more important that water for farms, the wineries and of course those pesky humans
 
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Hotshoe

Well-Known Member
Feb 15, 2012
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Wrong.

Limits are NEVER overcome. They are at best approached.
You're hilarious. California was supposed to be off of Colorado River by the year 2000. They don't contribute a drop to the Colorado. The headwaters are in Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona.
 

Catch50

Well-Known Member
Feb 5, 2003
36,861
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You're hilarious. California was supposed to be off of Colorado River by the year 2000. They don't contribute a drop to the Colorado. The headwaters are in Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona.
There's only a finite amount of available water in any given year. No matter where it comes from.
 

Ski

Well-Known Member
May 29, 2001
10,005
12,348
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plankton is more important that water for farms, the wineries and of course those pesky humans
Exactly. Instead of getting water from the oceans for humans we should be dumping many Californians into the ocean. Win/win.