Donny on Hannity Last Night

Jason1743

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Jan 23, 2006
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Donald made a couple of excellent (LOL) points last night. First that the President can declassify documents by thinking about it in his head. There doesn't have to be a process. Great way to handle top secret documents, don't you think? Secondly, Trump mused that the FBI agents who raided Mara Lago were searching for the missing Hillary Clinton e-mails from 2015-6. It couldn't have been the 15 boxes of government documents and over 300 classified documents that they found or the fact that Trump ignored a federal subpoena.
It's all a radical left conspiracy.
 

psu skp

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50 yard line after dark

Donald made a couple of excellent (LOL) points last night. First that the President can declassify documents by thinking about it in his head. There doesn't have to be a process. Great way to handle top secret documents, don't you think? Secondly, Trump mused that the FBI agents who raided Mara Lago were searching for the missing Hillary Clinton e-mails from 2015-6. It couldn't have been the 15 boxes of government documents and over 300 classified documents that they found or the fact that Trump ignored a federal subpoena.
It's all a radical left conspiracy.
And people still wonder why CNN is failing so miserably... Could it be that they don't actually report facts and news but merely traffic in tired leftist talking points that nobody cares about?
 

Jason1743

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Jan 23, 2006
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And people still wonder why CNN is failing so miserably... Could it be that they don't actually report facts and news but merely traffic in tired leftist talking points that nobody cares about?
Are you saying that these words did not come out of the mouth of Orange Jesus?
 
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WPTLION

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Are you saying that these words did not come out of the mouth of Orange Jesus?
Actually, the Hillary emails were brought up by Hannity. What he did say, which is not a stretch is they were looking for his info about Russia gate and spying on his campaign. Did you happen to hear he also kept the surveillance running while the search was going on? He has the video.
 
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Obliviax

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Actually, the Hillary emails were brought up by Hannity. What he did say, which is not a stretch is they were looking for his info about Russia gate and spying on his campaign. Did you happen to hear he also kept the surveillance running while the search was going on? He has the video.
so the implication is that the FBI is trying to cover their asses relative to making up stuff about Russia (which we already know happened as they used the Steele Dossier, which they knew was fake, to get a FISA warrant against a primary candidate and, later, a sitting president.
 

RoyalT12

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Dec 3, 2020
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Are you saying that these words did not come out of the mouth of Orange Jesus?
No he can’t, because he didn’t watch it. Trump is out of his mind with panic and is spewing any stupid thing that flys in his head , like a kid knowing a butt whoppin is about to happen and they throw out the kitchen sink . He knows he is screwed on many fronts - it’s fun to watch.
 

PSUEngineer89

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Aug 14, 2021
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Donald made a couple of excellent (LOL) points last night. First that the President can declassify documents by thinking about it in his head. There doesn't have to be a process. Great way to handle top secret documents, don't you think? Secondly, Trump mused that the FBI agents who raided Mara Lago were searching for the missing Hillary Clinton e-mails from 2015-6. It couldn't have been the 15 boxes of government documents and over 300 classified documents that they found or the fact that Trump ignored a federal subpoena.
It's all a radical left conspiracy.
Why do you post? Are you trying to take the title of lowest IQ poster from Catch?

What did you score on your SAT and the year? I want to see how freaking dumb (or dishonest) you are.

From conservative Politifact in 2017:

The president’s classification and declassification powers are broad
Experts agreed that the president, as commander in chief, is ultimately responsible for classification and declassification. When people lower in the chain of command handle classification and declassification duties — which is usually how it’s done — it’s because they have been delegated to do so by the president directly, or by an appointee chosen by the president.

The majority ruling in the 1988 Supreme Court case Department of Navy vs. Egan — which addressed the legal recourse of a Navy employee who had been denied a security clearance — addresses this line of authority.

"The President, after all, is the ‘Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States’" according to Article II of the Constitution, the court’s majority wrote. "His authority to classify and control access to information bearing on national security ... flows primarily from this constitutional investment of power in the President, and exists quite apart from any explicit congressional grant."

Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy, said that such authority gives the president the authority to "classify and declassify at will."

In fact, Robert F. Turner, associate director of the University of Virginia's Center for National Security Law, said that "if Congress were to enact a statute seeking to limit the president’s authority to classify or declassify national security information, or to prohibit him from sharing certain kinds of information with Russia, it would raise serious separation of powers constitutional issues."

The official documents governing classification and declassification stem from executive orders. But even these executive orders aren’t necessarily binding on the president. The president is not "obliged to follow any procedures other than those that he himself has prescribed," Aftergood said. "And he can change those."
 

maypole

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May 9, 2022
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Why do you post? Are you trying to take the title of lowest IQ poster from Catch?

What did you score on your SAT and the year? I want to see how freaking dumb (or dishonest) you are.

From conservative Politifact in 2017:

The president’s classification and declassification powers are broad
Experts agreed that the president, as commander in chief, is ultimately responsible for classification and declassification. When people lower in the chain of command handle classification and declassification duties — which is usually how it’s done — it’s because they have been delegated to do so by the president directly, or by an appointee chosen by the president.

The majority ruling in the 1988 Supreme Court case Department of Navy vs. Egan — which addressed the legal recourse of a Navy employee who had been denied a security clearance — addresses this line of authority.

"The President, after all, is the ‘Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States’" according to Article II of the Constitution, the court’s majority wrote. "His authority to classify and control access to information bearing on national security ... flows primarily from this constitutional investment of power in the President, and exists quite apart from any explicit congressional grant."

Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy, said that such authority gives the president the authority to "classify and declassify at will."

In fact, Robert F. Turner, associate director of the University of Virginia's Center for National Security Law, said that "if Congress were to enact a statute seeking to limit the president’s authority to classify or declassify national security information, or to prohibit him from sharing certain kinds of information with Russia, it would raise serious separation of powers constitutional issues."

The official documents governing classification and declassification stem from executive orders. But even these executive orders aren’t necessarily binding on the president. The president is not "obliged to follow any procedures other than those that he himself has prescribed," Aftergood said. "And he can change those."
And he can even declassify secrets in his dreams.
Let me get this straight: Were the documents planted by the FBI or declassified by trump?
 

Steve G

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May 29, 2001
4,264
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1
Why do you post? Are you trying to take the title of lowest IQ poster from Catch?

What did you score on your SAT and the year? I want to see how freaking dumb (or dishonest) you are.

From conservative Politifact in 2017:

The president’s classification and declassification powers are broad
Experts agreed that the president, as commander in chief, is ultimately responsible for classification and declassification. When people lower in the chain of command handle classification and declassification duties — which is usually how it’s done — it’s because they have been delegated to do so by the president directly, or by an appointee chosen by the president.

The majority ruling in the 1988 Supreme Court case Department of Navy vs. Egan — which addressed the legal recourse of a Navy employee who had been denied a security clearance — addresses this line of authority.

"The President, after all, is the ‘Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States’" according to Article II of the Constitution, the court’s majority wrote. "His authority to classify and control access to information bearing on national security ... flows primarily from this constitutional investment of power in the President, and exists quite apart from any explicit congressional grant."

Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy, said that such authority gives the president the authority to "classify and declassify at will."

In fact, Robert F. Turner, associate director of the University of Virginia's Center for National Security Law, said that "if Congress were to enact a statute seeking to limit the president’s authority to classify or declassify national security information, or to prohibit him from sharing certain kinds of information with Russia, it would raise serious separation of powers constitutional issues."

The official documents governing classification and declassification stem from executive orders. But even these executive orders aren’t necessarily binding on the president. The president is not "obliged to follow any procedures other than those that he himself has prescribed," Aftergood said. "And he can change those."
Hey Mensa, it does not matter whether he classified or declassified those documents. At noon on Jan 20, 2021 HE WAS NO LONGER PRESIDENT, so he had no right to be in possession of any government documents, most especially those of military value. A document with valuable/ critical/ essential military information still has valuable/ critical/ essential military information that would be of great interests to foes aplenty regardless of its classification status. And as these were still government property, at noon Jan 20, 2021 Biden could have returned them to their previous classified status just by thinking it or saying it out loud and he did not even have to say it three times or click his heels. Not president = no right to have government documents in his possession, especially those with critical military information on them.
 

PSUEngineer89

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Aug 14, 2021
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Hey Mensa, it does not matter whether he classified or declassified those documents. At noon on Jan 20, 2021 HE WAS NO LONGER PRESIDENT, so he had no right to be in possession of any government documents, most especially those of military value. A document with valuable/ critical/ essential military information still has valuable/ critical/ essential military information that would be of great interests to foes aplenty regardless of its classification status. And as these were still government property, at noon Jan 20, 2021 Biden could have returned them to their previous classified status just by thinking it or saying it out loud and he did not even have to say it three times or click his heels. Not president = no right to have government documents in his possession, especially those with critical military information on them.
I am directly refuting the point of your moron, Jason.

I make no other claims.

Go take it up with the only guy on this board who is challenging Catch for lowest IQ poster.
 

WPTLION

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Jan 7, 2002
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so the implication is that the FBI is trying to cover their asses relative to making up stuff about Russia (which we already know happened as they used the Steele Dossier, which they knew was fake, to get a FISA warrant against a primary candidate and, later, a sitting president.
I think that's pretty much sums it up. And it would make sense since they met with him the week before. Doesn't sound like these are documents the National Archive are looking for.
 

WPTLION

Well-Known Member
Jan 7, 2002
3,411
3,768
1
Hey Mensa, it does not matter whether he classified or declassified those documents. At noon on Jan 20, 2021 HE WAS NO LONGER PRESIDENT, so he had no right to be in possession of any government documents, most especially those of military value. A document with valuable/ critical/ essential military information still has valuable/ critical/ essential military information that would be of great interests to foes aplenty regardless of its classification status. And as these were still government property, at noon Jan 20, 2021 Biden could have returned them to their previous classified status just by thinking it or saying it out loud and he did not even have to say it three times or click his heels. Not president = no right to have government documents in his possession, especially those with critical military information on them.
Not true, but nice try. He has rights to lots of Documents. Maybe you've heard of Obama 33 million? That said if they were that important when the FBI was there the month before why not ask for them back? And who said they had military value? That's been wild speculation that dies weeks ago.
 

2lion70

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Jul 1, 2004
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Donald made a couple of excellent (LOL) points last night. First that the President can declassify documents by thinking about it in his head. There doesn't have to be a process. Great way to handle top secret documents, don't you think? Secondly, Trump mused that the FBI agents who raided Mara Lago were searching for the missing Hillary Clinton e-mails from 2015-6. It couldn't have been the 15 boxes of government documents and over 300 classified documents that they found or the fact that Trump ignored a federal subpoena.
It's all a radical left conspiracy.
Pure Looney Tunes. The Orange one has gone way over the cuckoo's nest never to return. A real Space Cowboy with spurs and chaps.
 

2lion70

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Jul 1, 2004
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And people still wonder why CNN is failing so miserably... Could it be that they don't actually report facts and news but merely traffic in tired leftist talking points that nobody cares about?
It really took place on Fox - Sean Hannity show. Even SH was shocked at the total stupidity displayed.
 

2lion70

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Jul 1, 2004
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Actually, the Hillary emails were brought up by Hannity. What he did say, which is not a stretch is they were looking for his info about Russia gate and spying on his campaign. Did you happen to hear he also kept the surveillance running while the search was going on? He has the video.
Are you for real? Trump and Hannity both sounded like a couple of nuthouse residents talking about the theory of relativity - way out in the ether.
 

2lion70

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Jul 1, 2004
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I think that's pretty much sums it up. And it would make sense since they met with him the week before. Doesn't sound like these are documents the National Archive are looking for.
How many rabbit holes have you gone down? Alternate realities are not true reality - you need to check your facts because you are sounding really warped and touched in the head.
 

Hotshoe

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Feb 15, 2012
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Are you saying that these words did not come out of the mouth of Orange Jesus?
Tell us when you'll care about the pos Idiot in Chief sending our youth to defend Taiwan? Tell us Jason. We are all waiting. Want to send your kids?
 

NewEra 2014

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Jan 3, 2014
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The president does have broad declassification powers. The Mar-a-lago raid was a nothingburger, as is this NYS AG suing him for overvaluing his real estate assets. Both actions against Trump are laughably weak.


But I saw part of the Trump event with Hannity last night, and I didn't think Trump did well. He was starting to show his age with the cadence of his speech and his propensity to start and stop thoughts throughout the conversation. I'd much rather see DeSantis be the nominee.
 

Jason1743

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Jan 23, 2006
20,242
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Why do you post? Are you trying to take the title of lowest IQ poster from Catch?

What did you score on your SAT and the year? I want to see how freaking dumb (or dishonest) you are.

From conservative Politifact in 2017:

The president’s classification and declassification powers are broad
Experts agreed that the president, as commander in chief, is ultimately responsible for classification and declassification. When people lower in the chain of command handle classification and declassification duties — which is usually how it’s done — it’s because they have been delegated to do so by the president directly, or by an appointee chosen by the president.

The majority ruling in the 1988 Supreme Court case Department of Navy vs. Egan — which addressed the legal recourse of a Navy employee who had been denied a security clearance — addresses this line of authority.

"The President, after all, is the ‘Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States’" according to Article II of the Constitution, the court’s majority wrote. "His authority to classify and control access to information bearing on national security ... flows primarily from this constitutional investment of power in the President, and exists quite apart from any explicit congressional grant."

Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy, said that such authority gives the president the authority to "classify and declassify at will."

In fact, Robert F. Turner, associate director of the University of Virginia's Center for National Security Law, said that "if Congress were to enact a statute seeking to limit the president’s authority to classify or declassify national security information, or to prohibit him from sharing certain kinds of information with Russia, it would raise serious separation of powers constitutional issues."

The official documents governing classification and declassification stem from executive orders. But even these executive orders aren’t necessarily binding on the president. The president is not "obliged to follow any procedures other than those that he himself has prescribed," Aftergood said. "And he can change those."
For shits and giggles, 1420 in 1971. Trump didn’t declassify shit. There is a protocol.
Why do you post? Are you trying to take the title of lowest IQ poster from Catch?

What did you score on your SAT and the year? I want to see how freaking dumb (or dishonest) you are.

From conservative Politifact in 2017:

The president’s classification and declassification powers are broad
Experts agreed that the president, as commander in chief, is ultimately responsible for classification and declassification. When people lower in the chain of command handle classification and declassification duties — which is usually how it’s done — it’s because they have been delegated to do so by the president directly, or by an appointee chosen by the president.

The majority ruling in the 1988 Supreme Court case Department of Navy vs. Egan — which addressed the legal recourse of a Navy employee who had been denied a security clearance — addresses this line of authority.

"The President, after all, is the ‘Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States’" according to Article II of the Constitution, the court’s majority wrote. "His authority to classify and control access to information bearing on national security ... flows primarily from this constitutional investment of power in the President, and exists quite apart from any explicit congressional grant."

Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy, said that such authority gives the president the authority to "classify and declassify at will."

In fact, Robert F. Turner, associate director of the University of Virginia's Center for National Security Law, said that "if Congress were to enact a statute seeking to limit the president’s authority to classify or declassify national security information, or to prohibit him from sharing certain kinds of information with Russia, it would raise serious separation of powers constitutional issues."

The official documents governing classification and declassification stem from executive orders. But even these executive orders aren’t necessarily binding on the president. The president is not "obliged to follow any procedures other than those that he himself has prescribed," Aftergood said. "And he can change those."
For shits and giggles, 1420 in 1971.
There is a protocol for declassifying documents. The President can’t do it in his own mind and not tell anyone. I can’t think of anything more reckless than blanket declassifying dozens of boxes of documents, some of which contain nuclear secrets. And most of which I’m sure Trump never read (unless there are pictures).
When the Special Master asked Trump lawyers for proof of declassification, they did not provide any. It doesn’t exist. The funny fact is, it doesn’t matter. Trump stole documents that didn’t belong to him. Trump Defied a subpoena to return them and lied to the FBI about them. His theft is irrelevant to the classification.
it’s not a close call. Trump is 100% in the wrong. All his arguments are for delay and to stir up uneducated toadies such as yourself.
 
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PSUEngineer89

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For shits and giggles, 1420 in 1971. Trump didn’t declassify shit. There is a protocol.

For shits and giggles, 1420 in 1971.
There is a protocol for declassifying documents. The President can’t do it in his own mind and not tell anyone. I can’t think of anything more reckless than blanket declassifying dozens of boxes of documents, some of which contain nuclear secrets.
When the Special Master asked Trump lawyers for proof of declassification, they did not provide any. It doesn’t exist. The funny fact is, it doesn’t matter. Trump stole documents that didn’t belong to him. Trump Defied a subpoena to return them and lied to the FBI about them. His theft is irrelevant to the classification.
it’s not a close call. Trump is 100% in the wrong. All his arguments are for delay and to stir up uneducated toadies such as yourself.
You are obviously lying.

But it’s great to know you’re very old.
 

JeffClear

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Oct 15, 2017
10,381
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Why do you post? Are you trying to take the title of lowest IQ poster from Catch?

What did you score on your SAT and the year? I want to see how freaking dumb (or dishonest) you are.

From conservative Politifact in 2017:

The president’s classification and declassification powers are broad
Experts agreed that the president, as commander in chief, is ultimately responsible for classification and declassification. When people lower in the chain of command handle classification and declassification duties — which is usually how it’s done — it’s because they have been delegated to do so by the president directly, or by an appointee chosen by the president.

The majority ruling in the 1988 Supreme Court case Department of Navy vs. Egan — which addressed the legal recourse of a Navy employee who had been denied a security clearance — addresses this line of authority.

"The President, after all, is the ‘Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States’" according to Article II of the Constitution, the court’s majority wrote. "His authority to classify and control access to information bearing on national security ... flows primarily from this constitutional investment of power in the President, and exists quite apart from any explicit congressional grant."

Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy, said that such authority gives the president the authority to "classify and declassify at will."

In fact, Robert F. Turner, associate director of the University of Virginia's Center for National Security Law, said that "if Congress were to enact a statute seeking to limit the president’s authority to classify or declassify national security information, or to prohibit him from sharing certain kinds of information with Russia, it would raise serious separation of powers constitutional issues."

The official documents governing classification and declassification stem from executive orders. But even these executive orders aren’t necessarily binding on the president. The president is not "obliged to follow any procedures other than those that he himself has prescribed," Aftergood said. "And he can change those."
The issue is not whether or not the president has the authority to declassify documents but whether he actually did declassify them.
As the appeals court wrote, Trump and his lawyers have offered no proof that he actually declassified the documents.
And even if he did declassify the documents, the court ruled that Trump provided no evidence that he had the legal right to have the documents in his personal possession.
It was a unanimous decision by the court and Trump appointed 2 of the 3 judges.
They even called Trump's declassification arguments a "red herring."
This ruling is a significant blow to Trump and his legal team.
 

PSUEngineer89

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Aug 14, 2021
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The issue is not whether or not the president has the authority to declassify documents but whether he actually did declassify them.
As the appeals court wrote, Trump and his lawyers have offered no proof that he actually declassified the documents.
And even if he did declassify the documents, the court ruled that Trump provided no evidence that he had the legal right to have the documents in his personal possession.
It was a unanimous decision by the court and Trump appointed 2 of the 3 judges.
They even called Trump's declassification arguments a "red herring."
This ruling is a significant blow to Trump and his legal team.
the burden of proof is on the prosecution.

Trump can declassify at will, and need not follow any process.

Show me the process he is supposed to follow.
 

Steve G

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May 29, 2001
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Not true, but nice try. He has rights to lots of Documents. Maybe you've heard of Obama 33 million? That said if they were that important when the FBI was there the month before why not ask for them back? And who said they had military value? That's been wild speculation that dies weeks ago.
Wow not true and man are you gullible!!! The Obama 33 million has been totally debunked and shown to be fake news as it were!!! To wit:


AP’S ASSESSMENT: False. Obama administration records are exclusively held and maintained by the National Archives and Records Administration, the federal agency confirmed on Friday. Millions of unclassified documents were transferred after Obama left office to a NARA facility in Chicago, but neither Obama’s personal foundation nor the facility set to house his presidential memorabilia have control over those papers.

But these records were given to NARA in 2017, upon the end of Obama’s term, and they remain in NARA’s sole custody, in accordance with federal law. Some 30 million documents were moved to a NARA-operated facility in the Chicago area, as the agency explained in a statement Friday, but none were classified. The administration’s classified documents are stored in a separate NARA facility in the Washington, D.C., area.


September 8, 2022, statement

Some news outlets and individuals on social media are mistakenly reporting that the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) confirmed that a large number of boxes of Presidential records are missing from the Barack Obama administration. This is false. NARA has never issued any such statement and is not aware of any missing boxes of Presidential records from the Obama administration.

August 12, 2022, statement

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) assumed exclusive legal and physical custody of Obama Presidential records when President Barack Obama left office in 2017, in accordance with the Presidential Records Act (PRA). NARA moved approximately 30 million pages of unclassified records to a NARA facility in the Chicago area where they are maintained exclusively by NARA. Additionally, NARA maintains the classified Obama Presidential records in a NARA facility in the Washington, DC, area. As required by the PRA, former President Obama has no control over where and how NARA stores the Presidential records of his Administration.

What's that line in Forrest Gump......stupid is as stupid does.......
 
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JeffClear

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Oct 15, 2017
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the burden of proof is on the prosecution.

Trump can declassify at will, and need not follow any process.

Show me the process he is supposed to follow.
If he doesn't follow a process and can't verify he did it, he puts himself at risk.
A prosecutor can throw this in front of a jury and let them decide whether or not they believe Trump.
Remember, the jury (or a judge) decides what constitutes reasonable doubt.
If Trump can provide no other evidence that he declassified the documents other than his own statements that could make some people wonder, "why would he do such a thing, why wouldn't he have a witness present to confirm he declassified the documents?"
And they could conclude that he can't verify he did it because he never actually declassified the documents, especially if it was illegal for him to have the documents at his house even if they were declassified.
 

2lion70

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Jul 1, 2004
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the burden of proof is on the prosecution.

Trump can declassify at will, and need not follow any process.

Show me the process he is supposed to follow.
If a party makes a statement of 'fact' they need to have proof the statement is 'factual'. His legal team will not state the docs were declassified since they could be committing a crime by stating that with no facts to back it up. A liar like Trump has no compulsion to not lie - most people don't lie.
 

PSUEngineer89

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Aug 14, 2021
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The issue is not whether or not the president has the authority to declassify documents but whether he actually did declassify them.
As the appeals court wrote, Trump and his lawyers have offered no proof that he actually declassified the documents.
And even if he did declassify the documents, the court ruled that Trump provided no evidence that he had the legal right to have the documents in his personal possession.
It was a unanimous decision by the court and Trump appointed 2 of the 3 judges.
They even called Trump's declassification arguments a "red herring."
This ruling is a significant blow to Trump and his legal team.
moron, I am directly refuting Jas...ify at will. Try reading before commenting.
 

Jason1743

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Jan 23, 2006
20,242
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You are obviously lying.

But it’s great to know you’re very old.
The scientific method. If you don’t get the result you want, deny, change the subject or make something up.
With age comes wisdom. And if I wanted to lie about something, I’d lie about my age, not my SAT score. BTW, I took the test when I was 15. Actually I took it w twice. The first time i took it I was 14 and only scored 1350.
 
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LafayetteBear

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Dec 1, 2009
48,967
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Actually, the Hillary emails were brought up by Hannity. What he did say, which is not a stretch is they were looking for his info about Russia gate and spying on his campaign. Did you happen to hear he also kept the surveillance running while the search was going on? He has the video.
So? And? If Cheeto had video evidence (or other evidence) that FBI agents were there to seize "Hillary's e-mails" (whatever the heck THAT means), he should (and would) be ballyhooing it.

Trump went on Faux News (a receptive place for him, if ever there was one) and brayed ceaselessly about how those documents were his, about how he declassified them with his extraordinary mind powers (and kept no records of such declassification), and otherwise comported himself in his normal manner (think jackass). But when he had the chance to make his argument about declassifying documents to the Special Master, he declined to do so. And when he was deposed about these matters earlier this summer, he took the Fifth about four hundred (400) times.

Like your fellow Trump Cultists, you're defending the indefensible. It makes for great comedic entertainment, so keep it going.
 

pioneerlion83

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May 29, 2001
15,441
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SouthernMD, by way of NJ and PSU
And that whole sewage spill out of Trump's mouth about presidents can declassify docs "even by thinking about it", is complete ****ing bullshit. A 100% straight up lie. Which is why his lawyer won't say that BS in court, because they know its a lie, and saying a lie like that puts them in professional legal jeopardy.
 

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