Man Plugs $80k+ Electric Truck Into His House, Finds Out It Will Take Over 4 Days to Charge

BW Lion

Well-Known Member
Apr 9, 2020
5,887
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Congratulations. You’ve just purchased one of the most expensive high-performance electric trucks on the market.

You’ve gone green and you’ve done it in style with the GMC Hummer, starting at $86,645. That’s right — the Hummer’s now a green vehicle! What was once the biggest villain in the left’s war on fossil fuels is now the poster child for responsible off-roading.

That’s a hefty chunk of change, but at least you’ll be able to save a bit with government incentives. Most importantly, you can charge the car at home just like it was any other appliance. Easy, convenient and cheap, right?

Well, if you have a day or four to spare, sure.

In a viral video from a YouTube channel that specializes in electric vehicles, a man who tries to plug the Hummer into his home to charge finds it will take, at best, one day to charge — and that’s with special equipment installed.

Without it, you could be there for four days.

The video begins with standard 120V charging — or Level 1 charging, to use official jargon. This is the standard current your home already offers.

“Right now it’s about 6 p.m. on Tuesday,” the man says. “And it says it will be full by Saturday at 10:55 [p.m.], which is four-plus days of charging. Wow.”

To be fair, however, this won’t be how most Hummer owners will be charging their vehicle. Level 2 chargers are upgraded home stations which deliver a significantly higher amount of electricity than your regular home circuit would be able to deliver — but they require special equipment and installation.

According to Compare.com, the cost of a Level 2 charger is about $500 without installation, which must be done by a professional electrician.

However, our intrepid Hummer owner had one of those — the JuiceBox, a 240v charger, installed in his garage.

How much difference did that make? Not as much as you might think.

“Now it says it will be done tomorrow by 6:30 [p.m.],” the video narrator says. “So about 24 hours of charging from four percent to 100 percent.”

Of course, you don’t have to go to full charge; the vehicle’s screen says the Level 2 charger was adding 14 miles of range per hour. However, when you can fill a gas-powered truck in five minutes and not have to worry about installing a fast charger or leaving your truck plugged in every night, that’s not exactly easy or convenient.

And by the way, it’s not entirely cheap, either — especially if you decide you don’t want to charge your Hummer at home but at fast-charging stations that can get the job done in two hours.

Car and Driver went to an Electrify America charging station, where it cost over $100 to “fill up” the Hummer at 43 cents per kilowatt hour.

This is roughly consistent with how much it would cost to fill up a gas-powered Hummer made in the final production year — although Electrify America does provide a membership program that reduces the cost by roughly one-quarter. If you charge it at home, you’ll only be spending about $35 to fill it up — but you’ll be waiting quite a while.

And, by the by, don’t expect to use your electric truck to do truck-like things quite as well as gas-powered trucks do.

Automotive YouTuber Tyler “Hoovie” Hoover put Ford’s F-150 Lightning — another electric truck, although somewhat more modestly priced than the Hummer — to the test by towing an empty aluminum trailer 32 miles, and then assessing how well it handled its maximum towing capacity by then ferrying a recently purchased 1930 Ford Model A pickup truck back to home base.

Hoovie called the experience a “complete and total disaster from beginning to end.” He started with a 200-mile charge but lost 68 miles of range in the 32 miles he was towing just the aluminum trailer. Once the Model A was aboard, he lost “almost 90 miles of range in 30 miles.”

Cheer up, Hoovie. Plug that baby into a Level 1 charger and you’ll be ready to make a return trip in another few days.

Now, I don’t pretend that most — in fact, almost any — Hummer owners are going to be using Level 1. If you can drop a cool $86k on a retro-styled EV pickup truck, you can also get a Level 2 charger installed in your garage without your bank account incurring too much of a scrape. That still means 24 hours of charging, though, something that could be critical in an emergency.

Say you live in the state of California, which plans to outlaw the sale of new gas vehicles by 2035. Let’s also say your residence is suddenly threatened by a wildfire — I know, a very unusual thing in California, but we’re just spitballing hypotheticals here. If you only have 10 percent charge and you have to load everything you can into your vehicle, you don’t have a day to get a full tank. Good luck getting far and good luck finding an open fast-charging station on the highway, particularly in times of natural disaster.

Look, this isn’t to say electric vehicles don’t have their time and place. If you don’t mind the charging times and high price, the Hummer is actually a pretty sweet ride; it can go from 0-60 mph in 3.3 seconds, something the original Hummer might not have been able to do in 3.3 hours. It’s a high-tech, versatile vehicle that, from all appearances, is a blast.

But let’s be clear: The Hummer and its electric brethren aren’t at the point where they can replace gas-powered trucks, the same way EVs across the spectrum aren’t at the point where they can replace equivalent internal-combustion vehicles. Why are we on the precipice, then, of forcing new-car buyers to pay more for a vehicle that’s less convenient and often can’t do the work they need it to do?

EV technology won’t be ready to replace gas-powered cars anytime soon, and ignoring reality doesn’t make it go away — no matter how many pro-EV laws the Democrats pass.

 

KnightWhoSaysNit

Well-Known Member
Jul 19, 2010
9,960
11,097
1
In my view EVs have their place in small commuter vehicles, especially urban areas. If you are long-haul or in need of carrying capacity, there is still nothing like the ICE.

True to form, California is once again NUTS. Those people are clearly emotional, and mindless.

I am curious about the place of hydrogen in this category that is not suitable for electrification. We don't hear much about it but just a year ago it was in quite a few "green" conversations.
 

pawrestlersintn

Well-Known Member
Jan 26, 2013
16,456
24,710
1
In my view EVs have their place in small commuter vehicles, especially urban areas. If you are long-haul or in need of carrying capacity, there is still nothing like the ICE.

True to form, California is once again NUTS. Those people are clearly emotional, and mindless.

I am curious about the place of hydrogen in this category that is not suitable for electrification. We don't hear much about it but just a year ago it was in quite a few "green" conversations.
Their place is on the golf course.
 
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rumble_lion

Well-Known Member
Aug 7, 2011
23,603
5,791
1

Congratulations. You’ve just purchased one of the most expensive high-performance electric trucks on the market.

You’ve gone green and you’ve done it in style with the GMC Hummer, starting at $86,645. That’s right — the Hummer’s now a green vehicle! What was once the biggest villain in the left’s war on fossil fuels is now the poster child for responsible off-roading.

That’s a hefty chunk of change, but at least you’ll be able to save a bit with government incentives. Most importantly, you can charge the car at home just like it was any other appliance. Easy, convenient and cheap, right?

Well, if you have a day or four to spare, sure.

In a viral video from a YouTube channel that specializes in electric vehicles, a man who tries to plug the Hummer into his home to charge finds it will take, at best, one day to charge — and that’s with special equipment installed.

Without it, you could be there for four days.

The video begins with standard 120V charging — or Level 1 charging, to use official jargon. This is the standard current your home already offers.

“Right now it’s about 6 p.m. on Tuesday,” the man says. “And it says it will be full by Saturday at 10:55 [p.m.], which is four-plus days of charging. Wow.”

To be fair, however, this won’t be how most Hummer owners will be charging their vehicle. Level 2 chargers are upgraded home stations which deliver a significantly higher amount of electricity than your regular home circuit would be able to deliver — but they require special equipment and installation.

According to Compare.com, the cost of a Level 2 charger is about $500 without installation, which must be done by a professional electrician.

However, our intrepid Hummer owner had one of those — the JuiceBox, a 240v charger, installed in his garage.

How much difference did that make? Not as much as you might think.

“Now it says it will be done tomorrow by 6:30 [p.m.],” the video narrator says. “So about 24 hours of charging from four percent to 100 percent.”

Of course, you don’t have to go to full charge; the vehicle’s screen says the Level 2 charger was adding 14 miles of range per hour. However, when you can fill a gas-powered truck in five minutes and not have to worry about installing a fast charger or leaving your truck plugged in every night, that’s not exactly easy or convenient.

And by the way, it’s not entirely cheap, either — especially if you decide you don’t want to charge your Hummer at home but at fast-charging stations that can get the job done in two hours.

Car and Driver went to an Electrify America charging station, where it cost over $100 to “fill up” the Hummer at 43 cents per kilowatt hour.

This is roughly consistent with how much it would cost to fill up a gas-powered Hummer made in the final production year — although Electrify America does provide a membership program that reduces the cost by roughly one-quarter. If you charge it at home, you’ll only be spending about $35 to fill it up — but you’ll be waiting quite a while.

And, by the by, don’t expect to use your electric truck to do truck-like things quite as well as gas-powered trucks do.

Automotive YouTuber Tyler “Hoovie” Hoover put Ford’s F-150 Lightning — another electric truck, although somewhat more modestly priced than the Hummer — to the test by towing an empty aluminum trailer 32 miles, and then assessing how well it handled its maximum towing capacity by then ferrying a recently purchased 1930 Ford Model A pickup truck back to home base.

Hoovie called the experience a “complete and total disaster from beginning to end.” He started with a 200-mile charge but lost 68 miles of range in the 32 miles he was towing just the aluminum trailer. Once the Model A was aboard, he lost “almost 90 miles of range in 30 miles.”

Cheer up, Hoovie. Plug that baby into a Level 1 charger and you’ll be ready to make a return trip in another few days.

Now, I don’t pretend that most — in fact, almost any — Hummer owners are going to be using Level 1. If you can drop a cool $86k on a retro-styled EV pickup truck, you can also get a Level 2 charger installed in your garage without your bank account incurring too much of a scrape. That still means 24 hours of charging, though, something that could be critical in an emergency.

Say you live in the state of California, which plans to outlaw the sale of new gas vehicles by 2035. Let’s also say your residence is suddenly threatened by a wildfire — I know, a very unusual thing in California, but we’re just spitballing hypotheticals here. If you only have 10 percent charge and you have to load everything you can into your vehicle, you don’t have a day to get a full tank. Good luck getting far and good luck finding an open fast-charging station on the highway, particularly in times of natural disaster.

Look, this isn’t to say electric vehicles don’t have their time and place. If you don’t mind the charging times and high price, the Hummer is actually a pretty sweet ride; it can go from 0-60 mph in 3.3 seconds, something the original Hummer might not have been able to do in 3.3 hours. It’s a high-tech, versatile vehicle that, from all appearances, is a blast.

But let’s be clear: The Hummer and its electric brethren aren’t at the point where they can replace gas-powered trucks, the same way EVs across the spectrum aren’t at the point where they can replace equivalent internal-combustion vehicles. Why are we on the precipice, then, of forcing new-car buyers to pay more for a vehicle that’s less convenient and often can’t do the work they need it to do?

EV technology won’t be ready to replace gas-powered cars anytime soon, and ignoring reality doesn’t make it go away — no matter how many pro-EV laws the Democrats pass.

Maybe not such a great idea to purchase a 9,000 lb vehicle for cruising through fast food pickup windows?
 

rumble_lion

Well-Known Member
Aug 7, 2011
23,603
5,791
1
In my view EVs have their place in small commuter vehicles, especially urban areas. If you are long-haul or in need of carrying capacity, there is still nothing like the ICE.

True to form, California is once again NUTS. Those people are clearly emotional, and mindless.

I am curious about the place of hydrogen in this category that is not suitable for electrification. We don't hear much about it but just a year ago it was in quite a few "green" conversations.
Hydrogen was never a real consideration. It was being pushed by the fossil fuel industry because almost all hydrogen is currently produced via steam reforming of natural gas.

It’s so difficult to work with and so inefficient that even spreading millions of dollars of propaganda is not working.
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

Well-Known Member
Jul 19, 2010
9,960
11,097
1
Hydrogen was never a real consideration. It was being pushed by the fossil fuel industry because almost all hydrogen is currently produced via steam reforming of natural gas.

It’s so difficult to work with and so inefficient that even spreading millions of dollars of propaganda is not working.

Widespread use of batteries is going to produce problems too. Mining and recycling. Not sure it is worth it. Not for a global population growth that has no bounds.

Hydrogen is clean. It can be produced by electrolysis of water, using nuclear as the energy source.

My guess is that some form of adsorption will provide the storage solution.
 

1Hammers1

Well-Known Member
Jan 26, 2014
769
1,456
1
Even the tiny economy car called the model 3 only picks up 3 miles of charge in an hour on a 15 Amp 120 v outlet. This Hummer is fast. Driving a super heavy tank with a 3800 pound battery stops huricains from hitting Florida yo.
 
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rumble_lion

Well-Known Member
Aug 7, 2011
23,603
5,791
1
Widespread use of batteries is going to produce problems too. Mining and recycling. Not sure it is worth it. Not for a global population growth that has no bounds.

Hydrogen is clean. It can be produced by electrolysis of water, using nuclear as the energy source.

My guess is that some form of adsorption will provide the storage solution.

Recycling produces problems? Interesting take.
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

Well-Known Member
Jul 19, 2010
9,960
11,097
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Recycling produces problems? Interesting take.

Mining produces big environmental problems.

Recycling is necessary but adds cost. Tell me recycling batteries is cheaper than producing them from scratch and I am sold. Who is doing this, and for what cost relative to new? Second, tell me that all of the necessary minerals, from A-Z, are being produced as required in the USA. I think the truth is that this is way, way off in the future. So far that decrees like the one in California do nothing but empower China.
 

rumble_lion

Well-Known Member
Aug 7, 2011
23,603
5,791
1
Mining produces big environmental problems.

Recycling is necessary but adds cost. Tell me recycling batteries is cheaper than producing them from scratch and I am sold. Who is doing this, and for what cost relative to new? Second, tell me that all of the necessary minerals, from A-Z, are being produced as required in the USA. I think the truth is that this is way, way off in the future. So far that decrees like the one in California do nothing but empower China.

Tell me recycling batteries is cheaper than producing them from scratch and I am sold.

I'm not sure you understand what is meant by recycling batteries. It is not replacing creating batteries. The minerals in the old batteries are recovered and then used to create new batteries. The recycling replaces the mining.

Who is doing this, and for what cost relative to new?

Redwood Industries.


Second, tell me that all of the necessary minerals, from A-Z, are being produced as required in the USA.

If that is your standard then you can't really buy much of anything right now. \

If would be a good idea if someone was doing something about this problem.....

When it comes to electric vehicles and the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, almost all of the discussion has been around the consumer tax credit for buying an electric vehicle, including the interesting new battery aspects of that. That’s a big topic, but there’s a whole other battery angle separate from the consumer tax credit, and it’s huge.​
The short summary of the whole thing is that the IRA incentives for nearly every stage of battery production and the battery supply chain are very attractive, and since they stack on top of each other, the IRA is likely to stimulate a “gold rush” of sorts in battery mineral mining, battery mineral refining, battery cell production, battery recycling, and battery pack production in the United States. When you also consider that consumers will need to get batteries whose components don’t come from China, and that come from North America eventually, then it’s essentially a given that everyone in the industry now knows it should have battery mineral mining and refining as well as battery cell and pack production in North America.​
 
Last edited:

rumble_lion

Well-Known Member
Aug 7, 2011
23,603
5,791
1
Widespread use of batteries is going to produce problems too. Mining and recycling. Not sure it is worth it. Not for a global population growth that has no bounds.

Hydrogen is clean. It can be produced by electrolysis of water, using nuclear as the energy source.

My guess is that some form of adsorption will provide the storage solution.

Hydrogen is clean. It can be produced by electrolysis of water, using nuclear as the energy source.

It can but it is not because it's terribly inefficient. Hence why almost all hydrogen today is produced by steam reformation of natural gas.
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

Well-Known Member
Jul 19, 2010
9,960
11,097
1
Hydrogen is clean. It can be produced by electrolysis of water, using nuclear as the energy source.

It can but it is not because it's terribly inefficient. Hence why almost all hydrogen today is produced by steam reformation of natural gas.

That's the case because we don't have enough nuclear power. Making hydrogen in a reforming process through the "water gas shift" reaction produces carbon monoxide. It's not just about the (inefficient) endothermic nature of the reaction. Producing H2 this way produces an unwanted by-product. You don't get around the fossil fuel problem by introducing carbon into the reaction.
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

Well-Known Member
Jul 19, 2010
9,960
11,097
1
Tell me recycling batteries is cheaper than producing them from scratch and I am sold.

I'm not sure you understand what is meant by recycling batteries. It is not replacing creating batteries. The minerals in the old batteries are recovered and then used to create new batteries. The recycling replaces the mining.

What I am asking is about the economics. You are always touting the economics and I am saying we need to account for waste handling. Fossil fuels produce CO2. The Left claims that this type of waste generates climate change.

Batteries produce a bunch of minerals that would be hazardous if left to erode in the environment. So the cost of recycling is part of the cost of battery production. What is it? Is it cheaper to produce a battery by mining and manufacture or by recycling and manufacture? If the recycling step is more expensive then are you accounting for this expense?

Green New Deal advocates say the cost of CO2 is essentially infinite. What is the cost of battery cleanup and is that reflected in the cost of EVs?
 

rumble_lion

Well-Known Member
Aug 7, 2011
23,603
5,791
1
That's the case because we don't have enough nuclear power. Making hydrogen in a reforming process through the "water gas shift" reaction produces carbon monoxide. It's not just about the (inefficient) endothermic nature of the reaction. Producing H2 this way produces an unwanted by-product. You don't get around the fossil fuel problem by introducing carbon into the reaction.

But you do use natural gas which is why the fossil fuel industry loves hydrogen. It's just a why for them to survive.
 

rumble_lion

Well-Known Member
Aug 7, 2011
23,603
5,791
1
What I am asking is about the economics. You are always touting the economics and I am saying we need to account for waste handling. Fossil fuels produce CO2. The Left claims that this type of waste generates climate change.

Batteries produce a bunch of minerals that would be hazardous if left to erode in the environment. So the cost of recycling is part of the cost of battery production. What is it? Is it cheaper to produce a battery by mining and manufacture or by recycling and manufacture? If the recycling step is more expensive then are you accounting for this expense?

Green New Deal advocates say the cost of CO2 is essentially infinite. What is the cost of battery cleanup and is that reflected in the cost of EVs?

Fossil fuels produce CO2.

They produce a lot more waste products that just Co2.

Batteries produce a bunch of minerals that would be hazardous if left to erode in the environment. So the cost of recycling is part of the cost of battery production. What is it? Is it cheaper to produce a battery by mining and manufacture or by recycling and manufacture? If the recycling step is more expensive then are you accounting for this expense?

The guy that owns Redwood industries says that even at the small scale they are running at currently they can sell their recovered material profitably.
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

Well-Known Member
Jul 19, 2010
9,960
11,097
1
But you do use natural gas which is why the fossil fuel industry loves hydrogen. It's just a why for them to survive.

What? We're not talking about the fossil fuel industry. We are discussing green energy and comparing hydrogen as a means of energy storage versus batteries as a means of energy storage. The capacitance problem, not the energy generation problem. That isn't covered by your EVs anyway.

As a storage medium it doesn't get cleaner than hydrogen.

You know nothing about the oil industry. We could stop burning oil today and there would still be a huge role for oil. We would make things from it instead of wasting it -- probably a lot of parts for your electric cars, including the lubricants.
 

PSUEngineer89

Well-Known Member
Aug 14, 2021
6,944
11,976
1

Congratulations. You’ve just purchased one of the most expensive high-performance electric trucks on the market.

You’ve gone green and you’ve done it in style with the GMC Hummer, starting at $86,645. That’s right — the Hummer’s now a green vehicle! What was once the biggest villain in the left’s war on fossil fuels is now the poster child for responsible off-roading.

That’s a hefty chunk of change, but at least you’ll be able to save a bit with government incentives. Most importantly, you can charge the car at home just like it was any other appliance. Easy, convenient and cheap, right?

Well, if you have a day or four to spare, sure.

In a viral video from a YouTube channel that specializes in electric vehicles, a man who tries to plug the Hummer into his home to charge finds it will take, at best, one day to charge — and that’s with special equipment installed.

Without it, you could be there for four days.

The video begins with standard 120V charging — or Level 1 charging, to use official jargon. This is the standard current your home already offers.

“Right now it’s about 6 p.m. on Tuesday,” the man says. “And it says it will be full by Saturday at 10:55 [p.m.], which is four-plus days of charging. Wow.”

To be fair, however, this won’t be how most Hummer owners will be charging their vehicle. Level 2 chargers are upgraded home stations which deliver a significantly higher amount of electricity than your regular home circuit would be able to deliver — but they require special equipment and installation.

According to Compare.com, the cost of a Level 2 charger is about $500 without installation, which must be done by a professional electrician.

However, our intrepid Hummer owner had one of those — the JuiceBox, a 240v charger, installed in his garage.

How much difference did that make? Not as much as you might think.

“Now it says it will be done tomorrow by 6:30 [p.m.],” the video narrator says. “So about 24 hours of charging from four percent to 100 percent.”

Of course, you don’t have to go to full charge; the vehicle’s screen says the Level 2 charger was adding 14 miles of range per hour. However, when you can fill a gas-powered truck in five minutes and not have to worry about installing a fast charger or leaving your truck plugged in every night, that’s not exactly easy or convenient.

And by the way, it’s not entirely cheap, either — especially if you decide you don’t want to charge your Hummer at home but at fast-charging stations that can get the job done in two hours.

Car and Driver went to an Electrify America charging station, where it cost over $100 to “fill up” the Hummer at 43 cents per kilowatt hour.

This is roughly consistent with how much it would cost to fill up a gas-powered Hummer made in the final production year — although Electrify America does provide a membership program that reduces the cost by roughly one-quarter. If you charge it at home, you’ll only be spending about $35 to fill it up — but you’ll be waiting quite a while.

And, by the by, don’t expect to use your electric truck to do truck-like things quite as well as gas-powered trucks do.

Automotive YouTuber Tyler “Hoovie” Hoover put Ford’s F-150 Lightning — another electric truck, although somewhat more modestly priced than the Hummer — to the test by towing an empty aluminum trailer 32 miles, and then assessing how well it handled its maximum towing capacity by then ferrying a recently purchased 1930 Ford Model A pickup truck back to home base.

Hoovie called the experience a “complete and total disaster from beginning to end.” He started with a 200-mile charge but lost 68 miles of range in the 32 miles he was towing just the aluminum trailer. Once the Model A was aboard, he lost “almost 90 miles of range in 30 miles.”

Cheer up, Hoovie. Plug that baby into a Level 1 charger and you’ll be ready to make a return trip in another few days.

Now, I don’t pretend that most — in fact, almost any — Hummer owners are going to be using Level 1. If you can drop a cool $86k on a retro-styled EV pickup truck, you can also get a Level 2 charger installed in your garage without your bank account incurring too much of a scrape. That still means 24 hours of charging, though, something that could be critical in an emergency.

Say you live in the state of California, which plans to outlaw the sale of new gas vehicles by 2035. Let’s also say your residence is suddenly threatened by a wildfire — I know, a very unusual thing in California, but we’re just spitballing hypotheticals here. If you only have 10 percent charge and you have to load everything you can into your vehicle, you don’t have a day to get a full tank. Good luck getting far and good luck finding an open fast-charging station on the highway, particularly in times of natural disaster.

Look, this isn’t to say electric vehicles don’t have their time and place. If you don’t mind the charging times and high price, the Hummer is actually a pretty sweet ride; it can go from 0-60 mph in 3.3 seconds, something the original Hummer might not have been able to do in 3.3 hours. It’s a high-tech, versatile vehicle that, from all appearances, is a blast.

But let’s be clear: The Hummer and its electric brethren aren’t at the point where they can replace gas-powered trucks, the same way EVs across the spectrum aren’t at the point where they can replace equivalent internal-combustion vehicles. Why are we on the precipice, then, of forcing new-car buyers to pay more for a vehicle that’s less convenient and often can’t do the work they need it to do?

EV technology won’t be ready to replace gas-powered cars anytime soon, and ignoring reality doesn’t make it go away — no matter how many pro-EV laws the Democrats pass.

Talk about misleading.

Here is what matters.

How long to charge using normal home 220V from 5% to 80%. What's the range after 80% charge.

That's it.

Decide based on that. Nothing else.
 

Jason1743

Well-Known Member
Jan 23, 2006
20,242
13,881
1

Congratulations. You’ve just purchased one of the most expensive high-performance electric trucks on the market.

You’ve gone green and you’ve done it in style with the GMC Hummer, starting at $86,645. That’s right — the Hummer’s now a green vehicle! What was once the biggest villain in the left’s war on fossil fuels is now the poster child for responsible off-roading.

That’s a hefty chunk of change, but at least you’ll be able to save a bit with government incentives. Most importantly, you can charge the car at home just like it was any other appliance. Easy, convenient and cheap, right?

Well, if you have a day or four to spare, sure.

In a viral video from a YouTube channel that specializes in electric vehicles, a man who tries to plug the Hummer into his home to charge finds it will take, at best, one day to charge — and that’s with special equipment installed.

Without it, you could be there for four days.

The video begins with standard 120V charging — or Level 1 charging, to use official jargon. This is the standard current your home already offers.

“Right now it’s about 6 p.m. on Tuesday,” the man says. “And it says it will be full by Saturday at 10:55 [p.m.], which is four-plus days of charging. Wow.”

To be fair, however, this won’t be how most Hummer owners will be charging their vehicle. Level 2 chargers are upgraded home stations which deliver a significantly higher amount of electricity than your regular home circuit would be able to deliver — but they require special equipment and installation.

According to Compare.com, the cost of a Level 2 charger is about $500 without installation, which must be done by a professional electrician.

However, our intrepid Hummer owner had one of those — the JuiceBox, a 240v charger, installed in his garage.

How much difference did that make? Not as much as you might think.

“Now it says it will be done tomorrow by 6:30 [p.m.],” the video narrator says. “So about 24 hours of charging from four percent to 100 percent.”

Of course, you don’t have to go to full charge; the vehicle’s screen says the Level 2 charger was adding 14 miles of range per hour. However, when you can fill a gas-powered truck in five minutes and not have to worry about installing a fast charger or leaving your truck plugged in every night, that’s not exactly easy or convenient.

And by the way, it’s not entirely cheap, either — especially if you decide you don’t want to charge your Hummer at home but at fast-charging stations that can get the job done in two hours.

Car and Driver went to an Electrify America charging station, where it cost over $100 to “fill up” the Hummer at 43 cents per kilowatt hour.

This is roughly consistent with how much it would cost to fill up a gas-powered Hummer made in the final production year — although Electrify America does provide a membership program that reduces the cost by roughly one-quarter. If you charge it at home, you’ll only be spending about $35 to fill it up — but you’ll be waiting quite a while.

And, by the by, don’t expect to use your electric truck to do truck-like things quite as well as gas-powered trucks do.

Automotive YouTuber Tyler “Hoovie” Hoover put Ford’s F-150 Lightning — another electric truck, although somewhat more modestly priced than the Hummer — to the test by towing an empty aluminum trailer 32 miles, and then assessing how well it handled its maximum towing capacity by then ferrying a recently purchased 1930 Ford Model A pickup truck back to home base.

Hoovie called the experience a “complete and total disaster from beginning to end.” He started with a 200-mile charge but lost 68 miles of range in the 32 miles he was towing just the aluminum trailer. Once the Model A was aboard, he lost “almost 90 miles of range in 30 miles.”

Cheer up, Hoovie. Plug that baby into a Level 1 charger and you’ll be ready to make a return trip in another few days.

Now, I don’t pretend that most — in fact, almost any — Hummer owners are going to be using Level 1. If you can drop a cool $86k on a retro-styled EV pickup truck, you can also get a Level 2 charger installed in your garage without your bank account incurring too much of a scrape. That still means 24 hours of charging, though, something that could be critical in an emergency.

Say you live in the state of California, which plans to outlaw the sale of new gas vehicles by 2035. Let’s also say your residence is suddenly threatened by a wildfire — I know, a very unusual thing in California, but we’re just spitballing hypotheticals here. If you only have 10 percent charge and you have to load everything you can into your vehicle, you don’t have a day to get a full tank. Good luck getting far and good luck finding an open fast-charging station on the highway, particularly in times of natural disaster.

Look, this isn’t to say electric vehicles don’t have their time and place. If you don’t mind the charging times and high price, the Hummer is actually a pretty sweet ride; it can go from 0-60 mph in 3.3 seconds, something the original Hummer might not have been able to do in 3.3 hours. It’s a high-tech, versatile vehicle that, from all appearances, is a blast.

But let’s be clear: The Hummer and its electric brethren aren’t at the point where they can replace gas-powered trucks, the same way EVs across the spectrum aren’t at the point where they can replace equivalent internal-combustion vehicles. Why are we on the precipice, then, of forcing new-car buyers to pay more for a vehicle that’s less convenient and often can’t do the work they need it to do?

EV technology won’t be ready to replace gas-powered cars anytime soon, and ignoring reality doesn’t make it go away — no matter how many pro-EV laws the Democrats pass.

Thankfully Californians have THIRTEEN years for manufacturers to improve battery technology before 2035. I absolutely agree EV technology needs improvement.
 

pawrestlersintn

Well-Known Member
Jan 26, 2013
16,456
24,710
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Thankfully Californians have THIRTEEN years for manufacturers to improve battery technology before 2035. I absolutely agree EV technology needs improvement.
The first battery was made in 1800. It's amazing they have such a long way to go. What couldn't be accomplished in 222 years is going to see dramatic improvement in 13! Can't wait!

 
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rumble_lion

Well-Known Member
Aug 7, 2011
23,603
5,791
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Talk about misleading.

Here is what matters.

How long to charge using normal home 220V from 5% to 80%. What's the range after 80% charge.

That's it.

Decide based on that. Nothing else.

The GM Hummer is a kind of EV outlier as the vehicle is a huge 9,000 lb. beast with a massive 210 kWh batter. It has an on board 11 kWh charger but you will need a 240 volt 60 amp electrical circuit to drive the level 2 charger to it's max charging rate.
 

Jason1743

Well-Known Member
Jan 23, 2006
20,242
13,881
1
The first battery was made in 1800. It's amazing they have such a long way to go. What couldn't be accomplished in 222 years is going to see dramatic improvement in 13! Can't wait!

It may be hard to believe, but technology evolves quickly. The iPhone was introduced in 2007, the iPad in 2010. In 2000 34% of US computers used dial up internet access. By 2013 only 3% used dial up.
You can’t predict technological breakthroughs, but they occur every day.
 

Jason1743

Well-Known Member
Jan 23, 2006
20,242
13,881
1
Ah but don’t forget the rolling brown outs. It might take longer when you add them to the equation.
In Cali, put solar panels on your roof and charge your car with the sun! We might not know exactly where tech is headed, but it does march forward quickly.
 

WPTLION

Well-Known Member
Jan 7, 2002
3,414
3,785
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There was a study done a number of years ago comparing a Hummer to a Prius....Basically the Prius was worse for the environment because of the 3 sets of batteries needed over the life of the Hummer.
 

rumble_lion

Well-Known Member
Aug 7, 2011
23,603
5,791
1
There was a study done a number of years ago comparing a Hummer to a Prius....Basically the Prius was worse for the environment because of the 3 sets of batteries needed over the life of the Hummer.

Hard to believe that GM stopped selling Hummers because no one wanted to buy them.
 

Catch50

Well-Known Member
Feb 5, 2003
36,867
2,409
1

Congratulations. You’ve just purchased one of the most expensive high-performance electric trucks on the market.

You’ve gone green and you’ve done it in style with the GMC Hummer, starting at $86,645. That’s right — the Hummer’s now a green vehicle! What was once the biggest villain in the left’s war on fossil fuels is now the poster child for responsible off-roading.

That’s a hefty chunk of change, but at least you’ll be able to save a bit with government incentives. Most importantly, you can charge the car at home just like it was any other appliance. Easy, convenient and cheap, right?

Well, if you have a day or four to spare, sure.

In a viral video from a YouTube channel that specializes in electric vehicles, a man who tries to plug the Hummer into his home to charge finds it will take, at best, one day to charge — and that’s with special equipment installed.

Without it, you could be there for four days.

The video begins with standard 120V charging — or Level 1 charging, to use official jargon. This is the standard current your home already offers.

“Right now it’s about 6 p.m. on Tuesday,” the man says. “And it says it will be full by Saturday at 10:55 [p.m.], which is four-plus days of charging. Wow.”

To be fair, however, this won’t be how most Hummer owners will be charging their vehicle. Level 2 chargers are upgraded home stations which deliver a significantly higher amount of electricity than your regular home circuit would be able to deliver — but they require special equipment and installation.

According to Compare.com, the cost of a Level 2 charger is about $500 without installation, which must be done by a professional electrician.

However, our intrepid Hummer owner had one of those — the JuiceBox, a 240v charger, installed in his garage.

How much difference did that make? Not as much as you might think.

“Now it says it will be done tomorrow by 6:30 [p.m.],” the video narrator says. “So about 24 hours of charging from four percent to 100 percent.”

Of course, you don’t have to go to full charge; the vehicle’s screen says the Level 2 charger was adding 14 miles of range per hour. However, when you can fill a gas-powered truck in five minutes and not have to worry about installing a fast charger or leaving your truck plugged in every night, that’s not exactly easy or convenient.

And by the way, it’s not entirely cheap, either — especially if you decide you don’t want to charge your Hummer at home but at fast-charging stations that can get the job done in two hours.

Car and Driver went to an Electrify America charging station, where it cost over $100 to “fill up” the Hummer at 43 cents per kilowatt hour.

This is roughly consistent with how much it would cost to fill up a gas-powered Hummer made in the final production year — although Electrify America does provide a membership program that reduces the cost by roughly one-quarter. If you charge it at home, you’ll only be spending about $35 to fill it up — but you’ll be waiting quite a while.

And, by the by, don’t expect to use your electric truck to do truck-like things quite as well as gas-powered trucks do.

Automotive YouTuber Tyler “Hoovie” Hoover put Ford’s F-150 Lightning — another electric truck, although somewhat more modestly priced than the Hummer — to the test by towing an empty aluminum trailer 32 miles, and then assessing how well it handled its maximum towing capacity by then ferrying a recently purchased 1930 Ford Model A pickup truck back to home base.

Hoovie called the experience a “complete and total disaster from beginning to end.” He started with a 200-mile charge but lost 68 miles of range in the 32 miles he was towing just the aluminum trailer. Once the Model A was aboard, he lost “almost 90 miles of range in 30 miles.”

Cheer up, Hoovie. Plug that baby into a Level 1 charger and you’ll be ready to make a return trip in another few days.

Now, I don’t pretend that most — in fact, almost any — Hummer owners are going to be using Level 1. If you can drop a cool $86k on a retro-styled EV pickup truck, you can also get a Level 2 charger installed in your garage without your bank account incurring too much of a scrape. That still means 24 hours of charging, though, something that could be critical in an emergency.

Say you live in the state of California, which plans to outlaw the sale of new gas vehicles by 2035. Let’s also say your residence is suddenly threatened by a wildfire — I know, a very unusual thing in California, but we’re just spitballing hypotheticals here. If you only have 10 percent charge and you have to load everything you can into your vehicle, you don’t have a day to get a full tank. Good luck getting far and good luck finding an open fast-charging station on the highway, particularly in times of natural disaster.

Look, this isn’t to say electric vehicles don’t have their time and place. If you don’t mind the charging times and high price, the Hummer is actually a pretty sweet ride; it can go from 0-60 mph in 3.3 seconds, something the original Hummer might not have been able to do in 3.3 hours. It’s a high-tech, versatile vehicle that, from all appearances, is a blast.

But let’s be clear: The Hummer and its electric brethren aren’t at the point where they can replace gas-powered trucks, the same way EVs across the spectrum aren’t at the point where they can replace equivalent internal-combustion vehicles. Why are we on the precipice, then, of forcing new-car buyers to pay more for a vehicle that’s less convenient and often can’t do the work they need it to do?

EV technology won’t be ready to replace gas-powered cars anytime soon, and ignoring reality doesn’t make it go away — no matter how many pro-EV laws the Democrats pass.

Man volunteers for Mars mission ... finds out no women will want to go. And finds out the food will suck.
 

SR108

Well-Known Member
Jan 13, 2004
16,741
6,655
1

Congratulations. You’ve just purchased one of the most expensive high-performance electric trucks on the market.

You’ve gone green and you’ve done it in style with the GMC Hummer, starting at $86,645. That’s right — the Hummer’s now a green vehicle! What was once the biggest villain in the left’s war on fossil fuels is now the poster child for responsible off-roading.

That’s a hefty chunk of change, but at least you’ll be able to save a bit with government incentives. Most importantly, you can charge the car at home just like it was any other appliance. Easy, convenient and cheap, right?

Well, if you have a day or four to spare, sure.

In a viral video from a YouTube channel that specializes in electric vehicles, a man who tries to plug the Hummer into his home to charge finds it will take, at best, one day to charge — and that’s with special equipment installed.

Without it, you could be there for four days.

The video begins with standard 120V charging — or Level 1 charging, to use official jargon. This is the standard current your home already offers.

“Right now it’s about 6 p.m. on Tuesday,” the man says. “And it says it will be full by Saturday at 10:55 [p.m.], which is four-plus days of charging. Wow.”

To be fair, however, this won’t be how most Hummer owners will be charging their vehicle. Level 2 chargers are upgraded home stations which deliver a significantly higher amount of electricity than your regular home circuit would be able to deliver — but they require special equipment and installation.

According to Compare.com, the cost of a Level 2 charger is about $500 without installation, which must be done by a professional electrician.

However, our intrepid Hummer owner had one of those — the JuiceBox, a 240v charger, installed in his garage.

How much difference did that make? Not as much as you might think.

“Now it says it will be done tomorrow by 6:30 [p.m.],” the video narrator says. “So about 24 hours of charging from four percent to 100 percent.”

Of course, you don’t have to go to full charge; the vehicle’s screen says the Level 2 charger was adding 14 miles of range per hour. However, when you can fill a gas-powered truck in five minutes and not have to worry about installing a fast charger or leaving your truck plugged in every night, that’s not exactly easy or convenient.

And by the way, it’s not entirely cheap, either — especially if you decide you don’t want to charge your Hummer at home but at fast-charging stations that can get the job done in two hours.

Car and Driver went to an Electrify America charging station, where it cost over $100 to “fill up” the Hummer at 43 cents per kilowatt hour.

This is roughly consistent with how much it would cost to fill up a gas-powered Hummer made in the final production year — although Electrify America does provide a membership program that reduces the cost by roughly one-quarter. If you charge it at home, you’ll only be spending about $35 to fill it up — but you’ll be waiting quite a while.

And, by the by, don’t expect to use your electric truck to do truck-like things quite as well as gas-powered trucks do.

Automotive YouTuber Tyler “Hoovie” Hoover put Ford’s F-150 Lightning — another electric truck, although somewhat more modestly priced than the Hummer — to the test by towing an empty aluminum trailer 32 miles, and then assessing how well it handled its maximum towing capacity by then ferrying a recently purchased 1930 Ford Model A pickup truck back to home base.

Hoovie called the experience a “complete and total disaster from beginning to end.” He started with a 200-mile charge but lost 68 miles of range in the 32 miles he was towing just the aluminum trailer. Once the Model A was aboard, he lost “almost 90 miles of range in 30 miles.”

Cheer up, Hoovie. Plug that baby into a Level 1 charger and you’ll be ready to make a return trip in another few days.

Now, I don’t pretend that most — in fact, almost any — Hummer owners are going to be using Level 1. If you can drop a cool $86k on a retro-styled EV pickup truck, you can also get a Level 2 charger installed in your garage without your bank account incurring too much of a scrape. That still means 24 hours of charging, though, something that could be critical in an emergency.

Say you live in the state of California, which plans to outlaw the sale of new gas vehicles by 2035. Let’s also say your residence is suddenly threatened by a wildfire — I know, a very unusual thing in California, but we’re just spitballing hypotheticals here. If you only have 10 percent charge and you have to load everything you can into your vehicle, you don’t have a day to get a full tank. Good luck getting far and good luck finding an open fast-charging station on the highway, particularly in times of natural disaster.

Look, this isn’t to say electric vehicles don’t have their time and place. If you don’t mind the charging times and high price, the Hummer is actually a pretty sweet ride; it can go from 0-60 mph in 3.3 seconds, something the original Hummer might not have been able to do in 3.3 hours. It’s a high-tech, versatile vehicle that, from all appearances, is a blast.

But let’s be clear: The Hummer and its electric brethren aren’t at the point where they can replace gas-powered trucks, the same way EVs across the spectrum aren’t at the point where they can replace equivalent internal-combustion vehicles. Why are we on the precipice, then, of forcing new-car buyers to pay more for a vehicle that’s less convenient and often can’t do the work they need it to do?

EV technology won’t be ready to replace gas-powered cars anytime soon, and ignoring reality doesn’t make it go away — no matter how many pro-EV laws the Democrats pass.

Did they mention the increase cost for electricity? My generation costs and distribution costs doubled, even with shopping around in PA.
 
Last edited:

pawrestlersintn

Well-Known Member
Jan 26, 2013
16,456
24,710
1
It may be hard to believe, but technology evolves quickly. The iPhone was introduced in 2007, the iPad in 2010. In 2000 34% of US computers used dial up internet access. By 2013 only 3% used dial up.
You can’t predict technological breakthroughs, but they occur every day.
Not sure what your point is. They've been working on battery technology for 222 years, yet here we are.