Do Not Get Rid Of Your Gas Vehicle Yet

rumble_lion

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Aug 7, 2011
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you're missing my point...Congress can add as much money to the president's budget as they want.....
If there are not actual dollars to cover the bill, then either something else gives or we're into deficit spending. Deficit spending leads to debt.
Sure, somebody has to "make" money to cover the deficit. I'm not arguing that.
Now with another point...other than your defense one...the democrats want universal child care, free education and more. If we can just create money (if that's what you're suggesting) then why haven't they just passed bills creating programs. It's just like the USPS example.
Creating money just seems like the modern monetary theory..just spend what you want. According to the MMT theorists, no problems.....unless you run into inflation (oops)

If there are not actual dollars to cover the bill,

There are never any "actual" dollars to cover any bill. The federal government doesn't have a room full of dollars. Unlike you or I they have no use for the dollars we own.

then either something else gives or we're into deficit spending. Deficit spending leads to debt.

The spending happens first then the federal government issues treasuries for the amount of the deficit spending. That due to law that Congress passed. They could eliminate the law and not issue treasuries and that would be the loss for the private sector to save dollars and earn a bit if interest risk free.

Sure, somebody has to "make" money to cover the deficit. I'm not arguing that.

Hmmm, there is no need to "cover" the deficit.

So in your opinion how are dollars created? You rejected my explanation so tell us how this whole monetary system works.

Now with another point...other than your defense one...the democrats want universal child care, free education and more. If we can just create money (if that's what you're suggesting) then why haven't they just passed bills creating programs.

Because the donor class does not get any benefits from those programs.

Creating money just seems like the modern monetary theory..just spend what you want. According to the MMT theorists, no problems.....unless you run into inflation (oops)

That is not the what MMT says at all.
 

junior1

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May 29, 2001
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If there are not actual dollars to cover the bill,

There are never any "actual" dollars to cover any bill. The federal government doesn't have a room full of dollars. Unlike you or I they have no use for the dollars we own.

then either something else gives or we're into deficit spending. Deficit spending leads to debt.

The spending happens first then the federal government issues treasuries for the amount of the deficit spending. That due to law that Congress passed. They could eliminate the law and not issue treasuries and that would be the loss for the private sector to save dollars and earn a bit if interest risk free.

Sure, somebody has to "make" money to cover the deficit. I'm not arguing that.

Hmmm, there is no need to "cover" the deficit.

So in your opinion how are dollars created? You rejected my explanation so tell us how this whole monetary system works.

Now with another point...other than your defense one...the democrats want universal child care, free education and more. If we can just create money (if that's what you're suggesting) then why haven't they just passed bills creating programs.

Because the donor class does not get any benefits from those programs.

Creating money just seems like the modern monetary theory..just spend what you want. According to the MMT theorists, no problems.....unless you run into inflation (oops)

That is not the what MMT says at all.
well, I guess I just have to admit that everything in the federal budget and financial process is proceeding just as it should. All is well, just keep spending, issue treasuries whereby interest gets paid from the created money and all is well.
Thanks for the education on how our system works.
Let's do this again when the debt is $35 trillion, because of $ trillion dollar deficits, and the USPS will in all likelihood still not have an all Electric fleet.
 
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Catch50

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Feb 5, 2003
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If there are not actual dollars to cover the bill,

There are never any "actual" dollars to cover any bill. The federal government doesn't have a room full of dollars. Unlike you or I they have no use for the dollars we own.

then either something else gives or we're into deficit spending. Deficit spending leads to debt.

The spending happens first then the federal government issues treasuries for the amount of the deficit spending. That due to law that Congress passed. They could eliminate the law and not issue treasuries and that would be the loss for the private sector to save dollars and earn a bit if interest risk free.

Sure, somebody has to "make" money to cover the deficit. I'm not arguing that.

Hmmm, there is no need to "cover" the deficit.

So in your opinion how are dollars created? You rejected my explanation so tell us how this whole monetary system works.

Now with another point...other than your defense one...the democrats want universal child care, free education and more. If we can just create money (if that's what you're suggesting) then why haven't they just passed bills creating programs.

Because the donor class does not get any benefits from those programs.

Creating money just seems like the modern monetary theory..just spend what you want. According to the MMT theorists, no problems.....unless you run into inflation (oops)

That is not the what MMT says at all.
Stefanie Kelton, possibly the most notable economist pushing MMT, DOES say that about the risk of inflation. I think she is correct but I know we can't spend as much as we want. Nevertheless, Republicans think we can balance budgets. Some may think we can eliminate the debt. They are dreaming.
 
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Catch50

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Feb 5, 2003
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well, I guess I just have to admit that everything in the federal budget and financial process is proceeding just as it should. All is well, just keep spending, issue treasuries whereby interest gets paid from the created money and all is well.
Thanks for the education on how our system works.
Let's do this again when the debt is $35 trillion, because of $ trillion dollar deficits, and the USPS will in all likelihood still not have an all Electric fleet.
Electric fleets for the USPS or missions to Mar? The money should go to law/drug enforcement.
 

rumble_lion

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Aug 7, 2011
23,601
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well, I guess I just have to admit that everything in the federal budget and financial process is proceeding just as it should. All is well, just keep spending, issue treasuries whereby interest gets paid from the created money and all is well.
Thanks for the education on how our system works.
Let's do this again when the debt is $35 trillion, because of $ trillion dollar deficits, and the USPS will in all likelihood still not have an all Electric fleet.
So in your opinion how are dollars created? You rejected my explanation so tell us how this whole monetary system works.
 

junior1

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May 29, 2001
7,304
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So in your opinion how are dollars created? You rejected my explanation so tell us how this whole monetary system works.
you know, there's an old expression.."you wrestle with a pig, the pig likes it, you get dirty" This match has gone on too long, I need a shower.
If you think you have a monopoly on money supply knowledge - which you brought up as part of a budget post - then I'm happy for you. But just google, or return to basic economics and you'll find your answers.
 

Online Persona

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Feb 2, 2022
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you're missing my point...Congress can add as much money to the president's budget as they want.....
If there are not actual dollars to cover the bill, then either something else gives or we're into deficit spending. Deficit spending leads to debt.
Sure, somebody has to "make" money to cover the deficit. I'm not arguing that.
Now with another point...other than your defense one...the democrats want universal child care, free education and more. If we can just create money (if that's what you're suggesting) then why haven't they just passed bills creating programs. It's just like the USPS example.
Creating money just seems like the modern monetary theory..just spend what you want. According to the MMT theorists, no problems.....unless you run into inflation (oops)
You want to know why the dems want universal child care? Because their funding = control. Why control child care? They think they own your children. Indoctrination used to only occur at the university level, then public K12 schools, now they want to start as toddlers.
 

rumble_lion

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Aug 7, 2011
23,601
5,790
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you know, there's an old expression.."you wrestle with a pig, the pig likes it, you get dirty" This match has gone on too long, I need a shower.
If you think you have a monopoly on money supply knowledge - which you brought up as part of a budget post - then I'm happy for you. But just google, or return to basic economics and you'll find your answers.

you know, there's an old expression.."you wrestle with a pig, the pig likes it, you get dirty" This match has gone on too long, I need a shower.
If you think you have a monopoly on money supply knowledge - which you brought up as part of a budget post - then I'm happy for you.

Hmmm, you know I'm wrong but you have no alternative explanation? You don't find that even a bit of issue?

But just google, or return to basic economics and you'll find your answers.

So what did your google search tell you?
 

Hotshoe

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Feb 15, 2012
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I just heard something on the news today that residents of the flood areas in Florida were told to stay away from their flooded EV’s because the batteries were exploding.
Water and lithium are a massive fire waiting to happen.
 
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rumble_lion

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If dollars are created in excess of total real output (gdp), then there is inflation.

If we are going to just print money, then let’s eliminate all taxation.

If dollars are created in excess of total real output (gdp), then there is inflation.

Hmmm, so government spending cannot create inflation as government spending is a component of gdp.

GDP = C + G + I + NX
C = consumption or all private consumer spending within a country’s economy, including, durable goods (items with a lifespan greater than three years), non-durable goods (food & clothing), and services.​
G = total government expenditures, including salaries of government employees, road construction/repair, public schools, and military expenditure.​
I = sum of a country’s investments spent on capital equipment, inventories, and housing.​
NX = net exports or a country’s total exports less total imports.​
 

rumble_lion

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Aug 7, 2011
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You want to know why the dems want universal child care? Because their funding = control. Why control child care? They think they own your children. Indoctrination used to only occur at the university level, then public K12 schools, now they want to start as toddlers.

You want to know why the dems want universal child care? Because their funding = control.

If you are worried about indoctrination of your children then you could just provide your own child care right? It's a voluntary program - you are not forced to use it.
 

PSUEngineer89

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Aug 14, 2021
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If dollars are created in excess of total real output (gdp), then there is inflation.

Hmmm, so government spending cannot create inflation as government spending is a component of gdp.

GDP = C + G + I + NX
C = consumption or all private consumer spending within a country’s economy, including, durable goods (items with a lifespan greater than three years), non-durable goods (food & clothing), and services.​
G = total government expenditures, including salaries of government employees, road construction/repair, public schools, and military expenditure.​
I = sum of a country’s investments spent on capital equipment, inventories, and housing.​
NX = net exports or a country’s total exports less total imports.​
That gdp definition then, is not a good measure of output.

Salaries and welfare are not output.
 

rumble_lion

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Aug 7, 2011
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That gdp definition then, is not a good measure of output.

Salaries and welfare are not output.

That gdp definition then, is not a good measure of output.

I think the press pretty much pushes it as a measure of the economy. It's really not, it's just a number that is easy to quote. Think of it as more like a proxy for new output created in our country rather than an absolute measure of economic activity. Now you could say that new output created in the country is a pretty good measure of the economy. I'm not so sure.

GDP does not include any "black market" economic activity like drug dealing or prostitution. But those are economic activities even if we don't approve of them.

GDP also does not include the sales of used goods. So all sales of used cars does not count. Build a new house it counts, sell an existing house it does not count. GDP would not count any of transactions completed on Ebay for example.
 

NC.Lion

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Jan 11, 2021
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What a bunch of fud.

“If you’ve got cars coming into a petrol station, they would stay for an average of five minutes. If you’ve got cars coming into an electric charging station, they would be at least 30 minutes, possibly an hour, but let’s say its 30 minutes. So that’s six times the surface area to park the cars while they’re being charged. So, multiply every petrol station in a city by six. Where are you going to find the place to put them?”
Most EV charging will be done at home.

In reality, 80% of EV charging is done at home—almost always overnight—or while a car is parked during the workday.​
This "story" sounds like it was sponsored by Exxon.
I drive 8 hours every Christmas (often in traffic) to visit family. What happens in that case? Not to mention around the holidays you are probably in a line waiting for a charging station. Sounds like a complete disaster.
 

rumble_lion

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Aug 7, 2011
23,601
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I drive 8 hours every Christmas (often in traffic) to visit family. What happens in that case? Not to mention around the holidays you are probably in a line waiting for a charging station. Sounds like a complete disaster.

On long trips you would charge up at a level 3 charger. Tesla has a pretty big network of level 3 chargers and the cars routing system takes them into consideration for trip planning.

Tesla is currently growing its Supercharger network at an impressive rate. The automaker went from 23,277 Superchargers at 2,564 stations at the end of 2020 to 31,498 Superchargers at 3,476 stations at the end of 2021. That’s growing at a 35% year-over-year pace.​
The biggest stations can have over 100 charging stalls.

Harris-Ranch-drone-678x381.jpg
 

bdgan

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May 29, 2008
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Do Not Get Rid Of Your Gas Vehicle Yet
an interesting read...

Dr. Jay Lehr and Tom Harris, Jan 15, 2022

The utility companies have thus far had little to say about the alarming cost projections to operate electric vehicles (EVs) or the increased rates that they will be required to charge their customers. It is not just the total amount of electricity required, but the transmission lines and fast charging capacity that must be built at existing filling stations. Neither wind nor solar can support any of it. Electric vehicles will never become the mainstream of transportation!

The problems with electric vehicles (EVs), we showed that they were too expensive, too unreliable, rely on materials mined in China and other unfriendly countries, and require more electricity than the nation can afford. In this second part, we address other factors that will make any sensible reader avoid EVs like the plague. EV Charging Insanity.

In order to match the 2,000 cars that a typical filling station can service in a busy 12 hours, an EV charging station would require 600, 50-watt chargers at an estimated cost of $24 million and a supply of 30 megawatts of power from the grid. That is enough to power 20,000 homes. No one likely thinks about the fact that it can take 30 minutes to 8 hours to recharge a vehicle between empty or just topping off. What are the drivers doing during that time?

ICSC-Canada board member New Zealand-based consulting engineer Bryan Leyland describes why installing electric car charging stations in a city is impractical:

“If you’ve got cars coming into a petrol station, they would stay for an average of five minutes. If you’ve got cars coming into an electric charging station, they would be at least 30 minutes, possibly an hour, but let’s say its 30 minutes. So that’s six times the surface area to park the cars while they’re being charged. So, multiply every petrol station in a city by six. Where are you going to find the place to put them?”

The government of the United Kingdom is already starting to plan for power shortages caused by the charging of thousands of EVs. Starting in June 2022, the government will restrict the time of day you can charge your EV battery. To do this, they will employ smart meters that are programmed to automatically switch off EV charging in peak times to avoid potential blackouts.

In particular, the latest UK chargers will be pre-set to not function during 9-hours of peak loads, from 8 am to 11 am (3-hours), and 4 pm to 10 pm (6-hours). Unbelievably, the UK technology decides when and if an EV can be charged, and even allows EV batteries to be drained into the UK grid if required. Imagine charging your car all night only to discover in the morning that your battery is flat since the state took the power back. Better keep your gas-powered car as a reliable and immediately available backup! While EV charging will be an attractive source of revenue generation for the government, American citizens will be up in arms.

Used Car Market

The average used EV will need a new battery before an owner can sell it, pricing them well above used internal combustion cars. The average age of an American car on the road is 12 years. A 12-year-old EV will be on its third battery. A Tesla battery typically costs $10,000 so there will not be many 12-year-old EVs on the road. Good luck trying to sell your used green fairy tale electric car!

Tuomas Katainen, an enterprising Finish Tesla owner, had an imaginative solution to the battery replacement problem—he blew up his car! New York City-based Insider magazine reported (December 27,2021): “The shop told him the faulty battery needed to be replaced, at a cost of about $22,000. In addition to the hefty fee, the work would need to be authorized by Tesla… Rather than shell out half the cost of a new Tesla to fix an old one, Katainen decided to do something different… The demolition experts from the YouTube channel Pommijätkät (Bomb Dudes) strapped 66 pounds of high explosives to the car and surrounded the area with slow-motion cameras…the 14 hotdog-shaped charges erupt into a blinding ball of fire, sending a massive shock wave rippling out from the car… The videos of the explosion have a combined 5 million views.”

We understand that the standard Tesla warranty does not cover “damage resulting from intentional actions,” like blowing the car up for a YouTube video.

EVs Per Block In Your Neighborhood

A home charging system for a Tesla requires a 75-amp service. The average house is equipped with 100-amp service. On most suburban streets the electrical infrastructure would be unable to carry more than three houses with a single Tesla. For half the homes on your block to have electric vehicles, the system would be wildly overloaded.

Batteries

Although the modern lithium-ion battery is four times better than the old lead-acid battery, gasoline holds 80 times the energy density. The great lithium battery in your cell phone weighs less than an ounce while the Tesla battery weighs 1,000 pounds. And what do we get for this huge cost and weight? We get a car that is far less convenient and less useful than cars powered by internal combustion engines. Bryan Leyland explained why:

“When the Model T came out, it was a dramatic improvement on the horse and cart. The electric car is a step backward into the equivalence of an ordinary car with a tiny petrol tank that takes half an hour to fill. It offers nothing in the way of convenience or extra facilities.”

Our Conclusion

The electric automobile will always be around in a niche market likely never exceeding 10% of the cars on the road. All automobile manufacturers are investing in their output and all will be disappointed in their sales. Perhaps they know this and will manufacture just what they know they can sell. This is certainly not what President Biden or California Governor Newsom are planning for. However, for as long as the present government is in power, they will be pushing the electric car as another means to run our lives. We have a chance to tell them exactly what we think of their expensive and dangerous plans when we go to the polls in November of 2022.

Dr. Jay Lehr is a Senior Policy Analyst with the International Climate Science Coalition and former Science Director of The Heartland Institute. He is an internationally renowned scientist, author, and speaker who has testified before Congress on dozens of occasions on environmental issues and consulted with nearly every agency of the national government and many foreign countries. After graduating from Princeton University at the age of 20 with a degree in Geological Engineering, he received the nation’s first Ph.D. in Groundwater Hydrology from the University of Arizona. He later became executive director of the National Association of Groundwater Scientists and Engineers.

Tom Harris is Executive Director of the Ottawa, Canada-based International Climate Science Coalition, and a policy advisor to The Heartland Institute. He has 40 years of experience as a mechanical engineer/project manager, science and technology communications professional, technical trainer, and S&T advisor to a former Opposition Senior Environment Critic in Canada’s Parliament.

You do not need to have an advanced degree in mathematics to understand the term “Overload”! The average person, no matter where you live, can quickly identify the political feel-good sensation that is being attempted by those short sighted individuals who are promoting the EV revolution….Vehicle manufacturers, Charging station builders, Transmission Line contractors, Battery producers ... etc. “It’s Magic” ... and you are saving the planet by creating less pollution as you get rid of your gas burning vehicle and take out a five-year loan to pay for the shiny new $60,000 electric car. No more fill-ups at the service station and the global warming is solved. You can now sit back and imagine the new polar ice formations that are providing a safe environment for the Polar Bears, Seals, Penguins that we all adore. We have done our part saving humanity…..and you can see the smile on little Greta Thunberg’s face! BUT WAIT….why are we losing power at our house?

Well the short answer is…. We failed to understand that our electrical grid reached max capacity and was overloaded when all of the EV’s were plugged in tonight at the same time. The next short answer is ... where do you think the energy came from to supply the grid in the first place? It sure was not from Wind or Solar… nor from any other alternate energy source we use which, when all combined, only provides 7% of today’s use demand. It was from the traditional combustible resource called Hydrocarbons!

Until we discover a non-hydrocarbon energy source that is efficient and safe, GET OVER IT….we are committed to Oil & Gas!

America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.

Abraham Lincoln
EVs will make up more than 10% of all vehicles within a few years. Manufacturers have already started to make the switch and the government is subsidizing them.

States like California and NY have outlawed the sale of IC cars starting 2035. I think they'll be pushing those dates out.

Charging stations will be needed along thruways but not many other places. Most people will charge at home. I suspect a few government subsidized upgrades will allow that to happen as we get to 10% but certainly not 50%.

Gas stations will have to offer food like WAWA but they will have to add tables.
 

JR4PSU

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Sep 27, 2002
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The electric automobile will always be around in a niche market likely never exceeding 10% of the cars on the road.

Hmmm, never exceed 10% eh?

China is the largest automobile market in the world:

Share-wise, despite July showing another strong performance, plugin vehicles hit “only” 27% market share, since the overall passenger car market surged 30%.​

Full electrics (BEVs) alone accounted for 20% of the country’s auto sales last month!​
Europe:

Bernstein Research predicts all of Europe’s BEV sales will capture 14% of the market this year, 27% in 2025 and on to 50.5% in 2030.​
California:

The California New Car Dealers Association (CNCDA) reports that, during the first half of 2022, the overall light-vehicle registrations in California amounted to 853,347 (down by 17.9% year-over-year).​
According to the report, the demand for both new and used vehicles remains strong, but the main issue is on the supply side.​
Meanwhile, plug-in car registrations during the period increased by about 34% year-over-year to 152,749 (estimated), which translates into a record of 17.9% of the total market (compared to 11% a year ago).​
All-electric cars noted outstanding results with 128,855 units (up 59% year-over-year) and 15.1% market share, which is significantly more than conventional hybrids. Not only that. Currently, battery electric cars are above hybrids and plug-in hybrids combined.​
There are over 31 Million cars registered in California. So 152,749 EVs is 0.5%. There are ~1 Million EVs in CA. That’s still only 3%. It will be quite some time to get to a substantial representation. At 0.5% per year increase, it will take 14 years to get to 10%.
 
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junior1

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May 29, 2001
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On long trips you would charge up at a level 3 charger. Tesla has a pretty big network of level 3 chargers and the cars routing system takes them into consideration for trip planning.

Tesla is currently growing its Supercharger network at an impressive rate. The automaker went from 23,277 Superchargers at 2,564 stations at the end of 2020 to 31,498 Superchargers at 3,476 stations at the end of 2021. That’s growing at a 35% year-over-year pace.​
The biggest stations can have over 100 charging stalls.

Harris-Ranch-drone-678x381.jpg
there was recently and anecdotal story written by a journalist driving 178 miles...took her something like days to get there in her EV....she did all the preplanning, where to charge, when to stop etc...ads for all those charging stations are great but apparently not are all as advertised.
 

Sullivan

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Nov 24, 2001
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On long trips you would charge up at a level 3 charger. Tesla has a pretty big network of level 3 chargers and the cars routing system takes them into consideration for trip planning.

Tesla is currently growing its Supercharger network at an impressive rate. The automaker went from 23,277 Superchargers at 2,564 stations at the end of 2020 to 31,498 Superchargers at 3,476 stations at the end of 2021. That’s growing at a 35% year-over-year pace.​
The biggest stations can have over 100 charging stalls.

Harris-Ranch-drone-678x381.jpg

3,476 stations seems like a lot. But it only works out to an average of 1 per county throughout the United States (there are 3,243 counties in the U.S.).

In a state like Texas (254 counties), it works out to 1 fueling station for every 3 counties.
 
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SR108

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Jan 13, 2004
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I drive 8 hours every Christmas (often in traffic) to visit family. What happens in that case? Not to mention around the holidays you are probably in a line waiting for a charging station. Sounds like a complete disaster.
My wife’s uncle has a trout hatchery. The business that he buys trout food from recently purchased an electric F150 that was supposed to get 275 miles per charge. The first time they loaded it up for deliveries it lasted 75 miles before going completely dead, the lights would not even go on.

IMO we have a ways to go before electric vehicles will do the job.
 

Obliviax

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Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
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My wife’s uncle has a trout hatchery. The business that he buys trout food from recently purchased an electric F150 that was supposed to get 275 miles per charge. The first time they loaded it up for deliveries it lasted 75 miles before going completely dead, the lights would not even go on.

IMO we have a ways to go before electric vehicles will do the job.
more like a Ford F 15.0 ?
 

2lion70

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Jul 1, 2004
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I'm thinking of buying a 1970 Olds 442 with the Rocket 455 engine. I drove a 1966 396 SS and a 1968 Olds 442 - great cars.
 
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joeaubie21

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Oct 13, 2021
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Do Not Get Rid Of Your Gas Vehicle Yet
an interesting read...

Dr. Jay Lehr and Tom Harris, Jan 15, 2022

The utility companies have thus far had little to say about the alarming cost projections to operate electric vehicles (EVs) or the increased rates that they will be required to charge their customers. It is not just the total amount of electricity required, but the transmission lines and fast charging capacity that must be built at existing filling stations. Neither wind nor solar can support any of it. Electric vehicles will never become the mainstream of transportation!

The problems with electric vehicles (EVs), we showed that they were too expensive, too unreliable, rely on materials mined in China and other unfriendly countries, and require more electricity than the nation can afford. In this second part, we address other factors that will make any sensible reader avoid EVs like the plague. EV Charging Insanity.

In order to match the 2,000 cars that a typical filling station can service in a busy 12 hours, an EV charging station would require 600, 50-watt chargers at an estimated cost of $24 million and a supply of 30 megawatts of power from the grid. That is enough to power 20,000 homes. No one likely thinks about the fact that it can take 30 minutes to 8 hours to recharge a vehicle between empty or just topping off. What are the drivers doing during that time?

ICSC-Canada board member New Zealand-based consulting engineer Bryan Leyland describes why installing electric car charging stations in a city is impractical:

“If you’ve got cars coming into a petrol station, they would stay for an average of five minutes. If you’ve got cars coming into an electric charging station, they would be at least 30 minutes, possibly an hour, but let’s say its 30 minutes. So that’s six times the surface area to park the cars while they’re being charged. So, multiply every petrol station in a city by six. Where are you going to find the place to put them?”

The government of the United Kingdom is already starting to plan for power shortages caused by the charging of thousands of EVs. Starting in June 2022, the government will restrict the time of day you can charge your EV battery. To do this, they will employ smart meters that are programmed to automatically switch off EV charging in peak times to avoid potential blackouts.

In particular, the latest UK chargers will be pre-set to not function during 9-hours of peak loads, from 8 am to 11 am (3-hours), and 4 pm to 10 pm (6-hours). Unbelievably, the UK technology decides when and if an EV can be charged, and even allows EV batteries to be drained into the UK grid if required. Imagine charging your car all night only to discover in the morning that your battery is flat since the state took the power back. Better keep your gas-powered car as a reliable and immediately available backup! While EV charging will be an attractive source of revenue generation for the government, American citizens will be up in arms.

Used Car Market

The average used EV will need a new battery before an owner can sell it, pricing them well above used internal combustion cars. The average age of an American car on the road is 12 years. A 12-year-old EV will be on its third battery. A Tesla battery typically costs $10,000 so there will not be many 12-year-old EVs on the road. Good luck trying to sell your used green fairy tale electric car!

Tuomas Katainen, an enterprising Finish Tesla owner, had an imaginative solution to the battery replacement problem—he blew up his car! New York City-based Insider magazine reported (December 27,2021): “The shop told him the faulty battery needed to be replaced, at a cost of about $22,000. In addition to the hefty fee, the work would need to be authorized by Tesla… Rather than shell out half the cost of a new Tesla to fix an old one, Katainen decided to do something different… The demolition experts from the YouTube channel Pommijätkät (Bomb Dudes) strapped 66 pounds of high explosives to the car and surrounded the area with slow-motion cameras…the 14 hotdog-shaped charges erupt into a blinding ball of fire, sending a massive shock wave rippling out from the car… The videos of the explosion have a combined 5 million views.”

We understand that the standard Tesla warranty does not cover “damage resulting from intentional actions,” like blowing the car up for a YouTube video.

EVs Per Block In Your Neighborhood

A home charging system for a Tesla requires a 75-amp service. The average house is equipped with 100-amp service. On most suburban streets the electrical infrastructure would be unable to carry more than three houses with a single Tesla. For half the homes on your block to have electric vehicles, the system would be wildly overloaded.

Batteries

Although the modern lithium-ion battery is four times better than the old lead-acid battery, gasoline holds 80 times the energy density. The great lithium battery in your cell phone weighs less than an ounce while the Tesla battery weighs 1,000 pounds. And what do we get for this huge cost and weight? We get a car that is far less convenient and less useful than cars powered by internal combustion engines. Bryan Leyland explained why:

“When the Model T came out, it was a dramatic improvement on the horse and cart. The electric car is a step backward into the equivalence of an ordinary car with a tiny petrol tank that takes half an hour to fill. It offers nothing in the way of convenience or extra facilities.”

Our Conclusion

The electric automobile will always be around in a niche market likely never exceeding 10% of the cars on the road. All automobile manufacturers are investing in their output and all will be disappointed in their sales. Perhaps they know this and will manufacture just what they know they can sell. This is certainly not what President Biden or California Governor Newsom are planning for. However, for as long as the present government is in power, they will be pushing the electric car as another means to run our lives. We have a chance to tell them exactly what we think of their expensive and dangerous plans when we go to the polls in November of 2022.

Dr. Jay Lehr is a Senior Policy Analyst with the International Climate Science Coalition and former Science Director of The Heartland Institute. He is an internationally renowned scientist, author, and speaker who has testified before Congress on dozens of occasions on environmental issues and consulted with nearly every agency of the national government and many foreign countries. After graduating from Princeton University at the age of 20 with a degree in Geological Engineering, he received the nation’s first Ph.D. in Groundwater Hydrology from the University of Arizona. He later became executive director of the National Association of Groundwater Scientists and Engineers.

Tom Harris is Executive Director of the Ottawa, Canada-based International Climate Science Coalition, and a policy advisor to The Heartland Institute. He has 40 years of experience as a mechanical engineer/project manager, science and technology communications professional, technical trainer, and S&T advisor to a former Opposition Senior Environment Critic in Canada’s Parliament.

You do not need to have an advanced degree in mathematics to understand the term “Overload”! The average person, no matter where you live, can quickly identify the political feel-good sensation that is being attempted by those short sighted individuals who are promoting the EV revolution….Vehicle manufacturers, Charging station builders, Transmission Line contractors, Battery producers ... etc. “It’s Magic” ... and you are saving the planet by creating less pollution as you get rid of your gas burning vehicle and take out a five-year loan to pay for the shiny new $60,000 electric car. No more fill-ups at the service station and the global warming is solved. You can now sit back and imagine the new polar ice formations that are providing a safe environment for the Polar Bears, Seals, Penguins that we all adore. We have done our part saving humanity…..and you can see the smile on little Greta Thunberg’s face! BUT WAIT….why are we losing power at our house?

Well the short answer is…. We failed to understand that our electrical grid reached max capacity and was overloaded when all of the EV’s were plugged in tonight at the same time. The next short answer is ... where do you think the energy came from to supply the grid in the first place? It sure was not from Wind or Solar… nor from any other alternate energy source we use which, when all combined, only provides 7% of today’s use demand. It was from the traditional combustible resource called Hydrocarbons!

Until we discover a non-hydrocarbon energy source that is efficient and safe, GET OVER IT….we are committed to Oil & Gas!

America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.

Abraham Lincoln
Commies love Dimocrat suckers.
 
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rumble_lion

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there was recently and anecdotal story written by a journalist driving 178 miles...took her something like days to get there in her EV....she did all the preplanning, where to charge, when to stop etc...ads for all those charging stations are great but apparently not are all as advertised.

Yeah, that's not a real thing. I'm sure if you are clueless and did not buy a Tesla it's entirely possible.
 

rumble_lion

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rumble_lion

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It's a 9,000 lb EV.

It's almost like GM doesn't really want people to buy their evs.

Even GM is not all that excited about building these.

GM is currently producing 12 GMC Hummer EVs a day. This may seem like a very small number compared to the output of companies like Tesla, but it’s a step for the veteran automaker and its gargantuan all-electric pickup truck.​